Expressive arts therapy develops creativity and imagination
Expressive Arts Therapy

Date

By participating in parent-child activities, they can learn to cooperate with others, share and express their opinions. Not only does this help them build good relationships within the team, but it also improves their language and presentation skills.

Angie, an expressive arts therapist, recently went to the Anglican Welfare Association to conduct a parent-child expressive arts workshop. The children's ages range from 2 to 7 years old. Although the difference seems to be only a few years, they already span pre-school, kindergarten, and elementary school! Fortunately, they are very engaged in playing musical instruments, games, movements, and drawings. When a mother took away the painting completed by two generations of intergenerational collaboration, she said she wanted to hang the huge painting next to her child’s bed!

This workshop has a multifaceted impact on children's development. By participating in artistic activities, they can develop their creativity and imagination. Activities such as learning to draw, play instruments, games and movements stimulate their creativity and encourage them to express their unique thoughts and feelings.
Secondly, this workshop helps improve children’s communication and expression skills. By participating in parent-child activities, they can learn to cooperate with others, share and express their opinions. Not only does this help them build good relationships within the team, but it also improves their language and presentation skills.

In addition, art activities also help children to regulate their emotions and express themselves, and gain emotional comfort and satisfaction from them, which is very important for their emotional development and the cultivation of self-awareness.

This workshop also provides a fun and enriching learning environment for children. They can learn new skills and knowledge through play and creation, and their growth and development can be promoted through observation, imitation and practice.

More
articles